On Miltons Road

Art imbuing life with breath.. depth. To focus on an image and breath.

ancientart:

Conjoined Man and Woman (Curing Ritual Narrative), Jalisco, dates to 100 BC-AD 300, from Jalisco, Mexico.

Conjoined figures constitute an infrequent but not unknown narrative type of West Mexican tomb sculptures. […] Some double figures have been interpreted as portrayals of a marriage or otherwise affianced couple given that the man and woman touch or embrace and visually engage each other with what could be interpreted as a tender gaze of affection, as is seen in this sculpture. However, the rendering of personal affection is rare in Mesoamerican art, and the few Classic Maya examples from Jaina Island are interpreted as symbolic renderings rather than depictions of interpersonal intimacy. And although the often published “marriage couple” pairs of similar-looking male and female figures from West Mexico may imply a local tradition for ceramic portrayals of devoted couples, these pairings have no basis in archaeological reality.

[…] A closer examination of this paired figure artwork suggests an alternative interpretation as a healing ceremony by a shaman-curer and his patient. In myriad similar examples, one of the figures wears a curious panachelike or hornlike element atop his/her head, as seen here, which may identify the person as a shaman. Other conjoined figures feature one member grasping a rattle, rasp, or drum. These instruments are intimately associated with shamanic practice, and they are frequently integral to healing rituals among present-day shaman-curers in Mexico.

[…] The weight of the available evidence suggests that this exceptionally expressive and sensitive sculpture portrays a curing ceremony rather than an amorous couple. 

Courtesy & currently located at the Walters Art Museum, Balitmore, USA, via their online collections (where you can also read more about this artifact). Acession number: 2009.20.149.

— 2 weeks ago with 513 notes
Daddy plowing with his brother. Yes the ice will melt, and we will see the rich brown earth again!

Daddy plowing with his brother. Yes the ice will melt, and we will see the rich brown earth again!

— 3 weeks ago with 1 note

MERA Bowls - 166 at Foodsmiths now for sale. 50 In the Bisque Fire to glaze on Saturday… another 44 ready to be glaze fired. Less than 1 month to the Foodsmith’s Empty Bowls event. 

So proud of Linda, Lyndal and Rosie, who can now throw bowls without thought. And Wendy, Donna, Kirsten and Cedar, who have become glazing wizards. How wonderful to have a project that teaches so many, so much, and gives back to the community and helps fun local hunger programs!

— 1 month ago with 1 note
philamuseum:

Throwback Thursday: “That’s not art,” declared former President Theodore Roosevelt.In 1913, “The International Exhibition of Modern Art” opened at New York City’s 69th Regiment Armory. Including over 1,300 works of art by over 300 international artists, the exhibition was the first introduction to avant-garde art for many Americans. The show was met with cheers, jeers, guffaws, and even accusations of insanity. The Philadelphia Museum of Art is the proud home of many of these once outrageous works of art, though there is still the occasional echo of Theo’s lament 101 years later."The Armory Show," as it is called today, was revived in 1994, and the now annual exhibition opens today in New York City.”Nude Descending a Staircase (No. 2),” 1912, Marcel Duchamp, © Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris / Estate of Marcel Duchamp

I remember when I first saw this painting when I was 7. It changed my sense of movement and space. 

philamuseum:

Throwback Thursday: “That’s not art,” declared former President Theodore Roosevelt.

In 1913, “The International Exhibition of Modern Art” opened at New York City’s 69th Regiment Armory. Including over 1,300 works of art by over 300 international artists, the exhibition was the first introduction to avant-garde art for many Americans. The show was met with cheers, jeers, guffaws, and even accusations of insanity. The Philadelphia Museum of Art is the proud home of many of these once outrageous works of art, though there is still the occasional echo of Theo’s lament 101 years later.

"The Armory Show," as it is called today, was revived in 1994, and the now annual exhibition opens today in New York City.

Nude Descending a Staircase (No. 2),” 1912, Marcel Duchamp, © Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris / Estate of Marcel Duchamp

I remember when I first saw this painting when I was 7. It changed my sense of movement and space. 

— 1 month ago with 636 notes